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Carson Webb appointed the Butman Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

Carson Webb, Ph.D.

Carson Webb, Ph.D.

May 12, 2017

Carson Webb (PhD, 2014), has been appointed Butman Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Piedmont College (Demorest, Ga.), where he takes over the position from Barbara Brown Taylor, who retired from teaching in May. Webb joins Piedmont after two years as Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Eureka College (Eureka, Ill.), where he taught courses in historical and contemporary Christianity, Asian and Western religions, biblical studies, and coordinated lecture series. Previously he taught at Le Moyne College and Syracuse University. He earned a BA from Pepperdine University and an MA in Philosophical Theology from the University of Nottingham. He has published on Søren Kierkegaard and related figures, most recently "Kierkegaard's Critique of Eudaimonism: A Reassessment" in the Journal of Religious Ethics (forthcoming September 2017). He is currently working on a monograph entitled Kierkegaard's Absurd Joy: Religion, the Good Life, and Modernity.

Abel Gomez awarded the Toni Taverone Graduate student prize

Abel Gomez, Ph.D. Student

Abel Gomez, Ph.D. Student

May 6, 2017
 Congratulations to Abel Gomez for winning the Women and Gender Studies (WGS) Toni Taverone Graduate student prize for his paper, "Decolonizing the Chicana Spirit: Indigenous Religion and Chicana Feminism. Abel Gomez is a second year PhD student in the Department of Religion studying Indigenous, Neo-Pagan, and Latinx religious movements. His paper focused on ways Chicanas actively draw upon Indigenous religious traditions as an important dimension of their larger efforts towards decolonial feminist praxis. Abel earned his BA in Philosophy and Religion from San Francisco State University and MA in Religious Studies from the University of Missouri.

Dimple Dhanani was awarded the South Asia Center's Bharati Memorial Award.

Dimple Dhanani, Ph.D. Student

Dimple Dhanani, Ph.D. Student

May 6, 2017

Dimple Dhanani (Ph.D. Student) was awarded the South Asia Center's Bharati Memorial Award for the summer of 2017. This August, she plans to conduct pre-dissertation research in Gujarat, IndiaHer project explores the construction of gender, gendered spaces, and the allocation of material and social resources in the religious lives of Hindu women. She finds religion—both as an identity and an activity—to be an important axis to add to feminist intersectional analysis and aspires to bring together the methodologies of religious studies and women’s studies in her work. She earned her BA in Religious Studies and Certificate of Religion and Conflict from Arizona State University, MA in Asian Religion from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and MSt in Women's Studies from the University of Oxford. 

Daniel Heifetz will be a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Bucknell University

Daniel Heifetz joins Bucknell University as VAP

Daniel Heifetz joins Bucknell University as VAP

May 3, 2017
Daniel Heifetz (PhD, 2015) has accepted a position as Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Bucknell University, where he will offer courses on South Asian religions. He previously held a Merton Humanities Teaching Fellowship at Mercyhurst University. He received his MA in religion from Columbia University and his BA in religion and philosophy from Rutgers University. His recent articles on the role of scientific authority in a modern Hindu movement called the All Workd Gayatri Pariwar have been accepted by the International Journal of Hindu Studies and Nidan: International Journal for Indian Studies.

Congratulations Professor William Robert (Religion) and Professor Kathleen Baum (VPA)

Students use scarves as they participate in a movement exercise in class

Students use scarves as they participate in a movement exercise in class

April 28, 2017

Congratulations Professor William Robert (Religion) and Professor Kathleen Baum (VPA) on the success of their unique and innovative team taught course, "Performing Religion." For more information see Renée K. Gadoua's article for the College of Arts and Sciences News: In This Course, Performance Becomes Text. For those interested here is the syllabus for Rerforming Religion.

Religion Major Ericka Jones-Craven Participates in McNair Research Symposium

Ericka Jones-Craven

Ericka Jones-Craven

April 28, 2017

Ericka Jones-Craven's McNair Research Symposium project is entitled "Let it be" and is a study of student reactions to the experience of listening to the gospel recording "Total Praise" by the Syracuse University Black Celestial Choral Ensemble.  For more see the wonderful article by Sean Kirst in the Syracuse University News. For more about how studying religion and art photography has shaped Jones-Craven's work see her brief department bio: Ericka Jones-Craven.

Ken Frieden publishes Travels in Translation

Cover of Travels in Translation by Ken Frieden

Cover of Travels in Translation by Ken Frieden

April 24, 2017
Ken Frieden is the B. G. Rudolph Professor of Judaic Studies at Syracuse University. His most recent publication is Travels in Translation: Sea Tales at the Source of Jewish Fiction (2016). Prior books include Classic Yiddish Fiction (1995) and anthologies of Yiddish literature in translation, such as Tales of Mendele the Book Peddler (1996) and Classic Yiddish Stories (2004).

Synopsis

Ken FriedenIn Travels in Translation, Ken Frieden traces modern Hebrew back to 1780, when German Jews began to move beyond the narrow confines of Torah and beyond a worldview centered on Zion. Supplementing Hebrew pilgrimage narratives to the Holy Land, enlightened authors wrote and translated stories of travel in Europe, North Africa, the Americas, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific, and the Arctic.

Before it reemerged as a spoken language, Hebrew was like a ship in a bottle, anchored in the Bible and Talmud. Early modern speakers of Yiddish and German, by writing vividly of pilgrimages to the Holy Land and translating far-flung travel accounts breathed new life into Hebrew. As they overcame the tendency to quote biblical phrases at every turn, these authors developed a descriptive Hebrew that was capable of evoking distant sea travels and exotic lands. They pulled the ship out of the bottle and sent Hebrew back into the world.

Frieden’s fresh look at the origins of modern Jewish literature launches a novel approach to literary studies. At the intersection of travel writing, translation studies, and worldly horizons, textual referentialism focuses on texts yet reads beyond them to their referents. Frieden thus proposes a rigorous alternative to post-structuralism and New Historicism, reenergizing literary and cultural studies.

Publication by Syracuse University Press.

Reviews

“This book is an important revision to modern Hebrew literary history, demonstrating how the beginnings of a viable prose style go back to the early nineteenth century and translation played a crucial role.”— Robert Alter, University of California, Berkeley
“Frieden cogently traces the path of making Hebrew a viable living language to a coterie of writers who preceded Mendele by half a century."—Ruth Adler, professor of Jewish Studies and Comparative Literature at Baruch College
“The stakes, the scope, and the thrust of this book are exemplary, explaining how travel literature exemplifies the acts of cultural transfer that are so much at the heart of Jewish literary modernity. . . . Frieden lays out in admirably clear detail the linguistic pieces of the puzzle." —Jeremy Dauber, director of the Institute of Israel and Jewish Studies at Columbia University

Content via: Syracuse University Press, TravelsinTranslation.org, Ken Frieden Faculty profile.

The cover image is Joseph Mallord William Turner's The Shipwreck from The Tate and Image released under Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND (3.0 Unported) 

Maria Carson to be one of the Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows

Maria Carson

Maria Carson

April 20, 2017
Maria Carson (PhD Candidate) will be a Humanities Center Dissertation Fellow for the 2017-2018 academic year. During the next year, she plans to finish her dissertation entitled A Tzaddik Sighs: Abraham Joshua Heschel, Affect, and Nostalgia. This project uses affect theory to discuss how nostalgia permeates the work of rabbi, activist, and scholar Abraham Joshua Heschel. This research reflects her larger interests which lie in the intersections of Jewish theology, Jewish cultural studies, and gender theory. She earned her B.A. in Religious Studies and her B.F.A. in Theatre Management from DePaul University. She has an M.A. in Jewish Thought from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. 
 

Department of Religion Emeritus Faculty, Alumnae/i, & Students receive accolades

(l-r) Sara Swenson, Aarti Patel, Mallory Hennigar

(l-r) Sara Swenson, Aarti Patel, Mallory Hennigar

April 13, 2017

Several students, alumni and emeriti faculty from the Department of Religion have received awards recently, reflecting the caliber and diversity of the department’s fields of study. “The Department of Religion has excellent students who are working in a wide diversity of subject and cultural areas,” says Philip Arnold, department chair. “We are very proud of our current graduate students and our esteemed alumni.”

Recent awards:

Julie Edelstein G’17 was awarded the Bernard Bate Tamil Language Student Scholarship from the American Institute of Indian Studies. The scholarship honors the memory of Professor Bernard Bate, an expert in the Tamil worlds of South Asia, who died in March 2016. The scholarship covers travel expenses and tuition as well as a stipend for her living expenses in Madurai, a city in the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu, during summer 2017 and the 2017-18 academic year.

Edelstein’s research focuses on South Indian Hinduism, religion in Tamil Nadu and the Tamil diaspora, gender and sexuality. She is particularly interested in Madurai, the intersection of gender and deity possession, and religion in the Thirunangai (Tamil transgender) community.

Sara Swenson, a Ph.D. student, won the 2017 Theta Alpha Kappa (TAK) Albert Clark Award for best graduate paper. “‛Friending’ Buddhists in the Field: Using Social Media as an Ethnographic Method” was judged to be the best from the 22 essays submitted at the graduate level by a panel of three judges who teach at institutions with TAK chapters. In addition to a cash prize, her paper will be published in one of the two issues of the Journal of Theta Alpha Kappa in 2018.

Swenson also was awarded a Robert Ho Foundation Buddhist Studies grant through the American Council of Learned Societies to conduct ethnographic research in 2017-18 for her dissertation on Buddhist groups in Vietnam.

Aarti Patel, a Ph.D. student, was awarded the Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship Program through Syracuse University. It will fund the entirety of her fees for the South Asia Summer Language Institute at the University of Wisconsin.

Mallory Hennigar won two highly competitive fellowships to complete her dissertation fieldwork in India: an American Institute of India Studies Junior Research Fellowship and a Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship (since 2008 jointly funded by the U.S. and Indian governments). Titled “Living Babasaheb’s Buddhism: Caste, Conversion and Globalization among Ambedkarite Buddhists in Central India,” her research will be based at Nagaloka Centre, a community and training center at the nexus of two social movements: new Buddhist converts who revere the former “untouchable” Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, India’s first minister of law, who converted to Buddhism, and the British-based Triratna Buddhist Community.

Donovan O. Schaefer G’12 has accepted a position as an assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently a departmental lecturer in science and religion at Trinity College, University of Oxford. After completing his doctorate, Schaefer held a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Haverford College. His first book, “Religious Affects: Animality, Evolution, and Power” (Duke 2015), challenges the notion that religion is inextricably linked to language and belief. Rather, he proposes, it is primarily driven by affects.

Jenny Caplan G’15 will join the faculty of Towson University as an assistant professor in Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies. She will teach courses on modern Judaism in the Americas to both undergraduate and graduate students in the Baltimore Hebrew Institute, which is affiliated with Towson. She is currently a visiting assistant professor at Wesleyan University and held previous visiting appointments at Western Illinois University and Rollins College.
In addition, “The Weakness of God” (Indiana University Press, 2006), by John D. Caputo, Thomas J. Watson Professor Emeritus of Religion and Humanities, has been translated into French as “La faiblesse de Dieu” (Labor et Fides, 2016). The book won the 2007 American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion, Constructive-Reflective Studies. Caputo came to Syracuse in 2004 after retiring from Villanova University. He retired in 2011. 


Originally posted as: "Religion Department Garners Wave of Awards, Recognition: Awards reflect the diversity of research within the department" on  Apr 11, 2017 by: Renée K. Gadoua
http://asnews.syr.edu/newsevents_2017/releases/Religion_Graduate_Students_Win%20Awards.html

Jenny Caplan, Assistant Professor Towson University

April 12, 2017

Jenny Caplan (Ph.D. 2015) will be joining the faculty of Towson University as an Assistant Professor in the department of Philosophy and Religion. She will be teaching courses focused on Modern Judaism in the Americas to both undergraduates, and MA students in the Baltimore Hebrew Institute, which is affiliated with Towson. She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Religion Department at Wesleyan University, and helt previous visiting appointments at Western Illinois University and Rollins College. She earned her B.A. in religion and theatre studies from Wellesley College, and earned a Masters of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School. She has published on various aspects of Judaism and popular culture in journals such as The Journal of Modern Jewish Studies and Shofar, and has forthcoming essays on teaching American Jewish Humor for the MLA's Teaching Options series and Lenny Bruce and Jewish masculinity for a volume on post-Holocaust humor from Wayne State University Press.

Sara Swenson receives the Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program award

Sara Ann Swenson, PhD Student

Sara Ann Swenson, PhD Student

April 8, 2017

Sara Swenson (Ph.D. Student), has received the Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program award. With this support, Sara Swenson will complete 10 months of ethnographic fieldwork in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, interviewing members of newly founded lay and monastic Buddhist volunteer programs. Her project is entitled: "'Sharing Hearts': Buddhism, Social Services, and Privatization in Vietnam." The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies offers an articulated set of fellowship and grant competitions that will expand the understanding and interpretation of Buddhist thought in scholarship and society, strengthen international networks of Buddhist studies, and increase the visibility of innovative currents in those studies. The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Dissertation Fellowships provide one-year stipends for PhD candidates to devote full time to preparing dissertations. The fellowship period may be used for fieldwork, archival research, analysis of findings, or for writing after research is complete."

Reflection on the end of the Place of Religion in Film Conference

The Place of Religion in Film cover photo

The Place of Religion in Film cover photo

April 6, 2017
Last Weekend, March 31-April 1, the Department of Religion hosted the Ray Smith Symposium: The Place of Religion in Film, Thank you very much to all of the plenary speakers (Sara Horowitz, June Hwang, & Joaquim Pinto), conference presenters, and attendees. The lingering conversations and lively intellectual engagement with one another are what truly make conferences a fruitful endeavor. Prof. Zachary Braiterman writing about his experience of the conference states: "In the “best” films, if the divine or “the spiritual” make an appearance it is always sensed obliquely in the wake of some lived apprehension of the world." Conference organizers, Prof. M. Gail Hamner  (Religion) and Rebecca A. Moody (Ph.D. candidate, Religion) gathered scholars from ten countries and ten U.S. states. The robust international presence assured an unusually diverse and interdisciplinary discussion. The Symposium also foregrounded student work and training. At the opening dinner Rebecca Moody presented her Fulbright research on Moroccan film, and Ithaca College undergraduate, Dani Hobbs, screened her senior thesis film, "Good Neighbors" about refugees in Buffalo, NY. Then on Saturday, the conference hosted a mentoring lunch for graduate students wishing to teach religion and film, facilitated by Ithaca College Professor, Rachel Wagner, and funded by Peter Vanable, Associate Provost for Graduate Studies and Dean of the Graduate School. The Ray Smith Symposium is funded by Syracuse University Humanities Council, with support from Dean Karin Ruhlandt. Additional funding for this year's Symposium was provided by the Religion Department, the Humanities Center, the Graduate School, the English Department (with particular support from Prof. Roger Hallas), the Newhouse Department of Television, Radio and Film (with particular support from Prof. Tula Goenka), the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, and the Philosophy Department. Joaquim Pinto’s plenary session was made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts’ 2017 Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds Grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.

ALT-AC Career Panel

Four panelists are sitting facing and audience discussing other career options for Ph.D's in Religion, besides being a professor. Seated left to right is Prof. James W. Watts, Juliana Finucane, Jason Larson, & Jill Adams.

Four panelists are sitting facing and audience discussing other career options for Ph.D's in Religion, besides being a professor. Seated left to right is Prof. James W. Watts, Juliana Finucane, Jason Larson, & Jill Adams.

April 2, 2017

The Department’s Future Professoriate Program (FPP) hosted a panel of three PhD alumnae/i on March 25, 2017, to discuss careers for PhDs outside college/university faculty positions. It was a joy to welcome back to campus Juliana Finucane (PhD ’09), a Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. State Department, Jason Larson (PhD ’12), who is on the faculty of the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, CT, and Jill Adams (PhD ’13), Director of Experiential Learning for Oxford College of Emory University. Joining them on the panel was Dr. Daniel Olsen-Bang from SU Career Services. Not pictured: Daniel Olson-Bang of Syracuse University Career services.


Ann G. Gold to deliver a lecture at Vanderbilt University

Flyer for Ann Grodzins Gold's talk, Ann Grodzins Gold (Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion), to deliever a lecture entitled: "Never-ending Story of a Minor River in Rajasthan: Myth, Nostalgia, Despair, Effor, Hope"

Flyer for Ann Grodzins Gold's talk, Ann Grodzins Gold (Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion), to deliever a lecture entitled: "Never-ending Story of a Minor River in Rajasthan: Myth, Nostalgia, Despair, Effor, Hope"

March 29, 2017

Ann Grodzins Gold (Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion), to deliever a lecture entitled: "Never-ending Story of a Minor River in Rajasthan: Myth, Nostalgia, Despair, Effor, Hope" to the Vanderbilt University Department of Religious Studies.

Sara Swenson won the 2017 Theta Alpha Kappa, Albert Clark Award

Sara Swenson, PhD Student

Sara Swenson, PhD Student

March 23, 2017
Sara Swenson (PhD Student), won the 2017 Theta Alpha Kappa, Albert Clark Award for best graduate paper.  Her paper, “'Friending' Buddhists in the Field: Using Social Media as an Ethnographic Method” was judged to be the best from the 22 essays submitted at the graduate level by a panel of 3 judges who teach at institutions with TAK chapters.  In addition to a cash prize, her paper will be published in one of the two issues of the Journal of Theta Alpha Kappa in 2018.  JTAK is a peer-reviewed journal indexed by ATLA.

Julie Edelstein receives the Bernard Bate Tamil Language Student Scholarship.

March 22, 2017
 Julie Edelstein (MA Student), who will complete her Masters degree at Syracuse this spring, has been awarded the Bernard Bate Tamil Language Student Scholarship from the American Institute of Indian Studies.   Julie’s award covers not only travel expenses and tuition but provides a stipend for her living expenses in the city of Madurai during summer 2017 and academic year 2017-18.

John Caputo's The Weakness of God translated as La faiblesse de dieu

The Weakness of God/La faiblesse de dieu isbn: 9782830916034

The Weakness of God/La faiblesse de dieu isbn: 9782830916034

March 21, 2017
Professor Emeritus John D. Caputo's book The Weakness of God has just been translated into French as La faiblesse de Dieu (Labor et Fides, 2016).

"You Don't Know What Pain Is: Affect, Animals, and the Lifeworld" a talk by Donovan Schaefer

Donovan Schaefer (Ph.D. 2012).

Donovan Schaefer (Ph.D. 2012).

March 20, 2017
Donovan Schaefer (Ph.D. 2012) to deliver a talk entitled  "You Don't Know What Pain Is: Affect, Animals, and the Lifeworld" at LeMoyne College, Monday, March 20, 2017 at 5:30 p.m.

Announcing the publication of Place/No-Place in Urban Asian Religiosity edited by Joanne Punzo Waghorne, ARI-Springer Asian Series. Dordrecht/Heidelberg/London/New York: Springer, 2016.

Joanne Punzo Waghorne, Professor of Religion

Joanne Punzo Waghorne, Professor of Religion

February 28, 2017

Book cover for Place/No-Place in Urban Asian Religiosity edited by Joanne Punzo Waghorne, ARI-Springer Asian Series. Dordrecht/Heidelberg/London/New York: Springer, 2016.

Announcing the publication of Place/No-Place in Urban Asian Religiosity edited by Joanne Punzo Waghorne, ARI-Springer Asian Series. Dordrecht/Heidelberg/London/New York: Springer, 2016.

The volume developed from an international conference held at Syracuse organized by Ann Gold, Gareth Fisher and Joanne Waghorne with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the Central New York Humanities Corridor. The volume published through the Asia Research Institute (National University of Singapore) ARI-Springer series remains Syracuse-rich with chapters by Ann Gold and Gareth Fisher plus work of our alums Yohan Yoo and Juliana Finucane and a recent PhD from anthropology, Madhura Lohokare.

Contents


  1. Introduction: Negotiating Place, Non-place, and No-Place—Joanne Punzo Waghorne
  2. From Megachurches to the Invisible Temple: Placing the Protestant “Church” in the Seoul Metropolitan Area—Yohan Yoo
  3. No-Place, New Places: Death and Its Rituals in Urban Asia—Lily Kong
  4. Alone Together: Global Gurus, Cosmopolitan Space, and Community—Joanne Punzo Waghorne
  5. On Daoism and Religious Networks in a Digital Age—Jean DeBernardi
  6. Losing the Neighborhood Temple (Or Finding the Temple and Losing the Neighborhood): Transformations of Temple Space in Modern Beijing—Gareth Fisher
  7. Roadside Shrines, Storefront Saints, and Twenty-First Century Lifestyles: The Cultural and Spatial Thresholds of Indian Urbanism—Smriti  Srinivas
  8. Cosmopolitan Spaces, Local Pathways: Making a Place for Soka Gakkai in Singapore— Juliana  Finucane
  9. Neighborhood Associations in Urban India: Intersection of Religion and Space in Civic Participation— Madhura  Lohokare
  10. Making Places for Vivekananda in Gwalior: Local Leadership, National Concerns, and Global Vision— Daniel Gold
  11. Carving Place: Foundational Narratives from a North Indian Market Town—Ann Grodzins Gold

Available from Amazon in print and kindle expensive but…

Place/No-Place in Urban Asian Religiosity (ARI - Springer Asia Series)Jul 15, 2016 Edited by Joanne Punzo Waghorne ISBN:9789811003844

Philip Arnold to deliver a talk on the role of History of Religion in Decolonizing Sacred Space

February 6, 2017
Professor and Chair Philip P. Arnold, to deliever a talk entitled “History of Religion’s Role in Decolonizing Sacred Space: The Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center at the McGill the Centre for Research on Religion / Centre de Recherche sur la Religion (CREOR). (PDF)

Ahmed Meguid to deliver a talk at the University of Toronto

Ahmed Meguid, Assistant Professor

Ahmed Meguid, Assistant Professor

February 1, 2017
Prof. Ahmed Meguid, to deliever a talk entitled "Against Arbitrariness and Romanticism: al-Qarāfī’s Outline of the Legal and Ethical Logic of Sovereignty" to the Center for Ethics, at the University of Toronto.

AAR & SBL speak out against travel bans

January 30, 2017

Recent statements from our our learned societies regarding the U.S. Executive Order “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” 

William Robert was promoted to Associate Professor

January 5, 2017

William Robert (Associate Professor) was promoted to his current rank effective Fall 2016. Dr. Robert has been with Syracuse University for ten years, coming to SU as a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the College of Arts and Sciences in 2006, followed by successive appointments in the Department of Religion as Visiting Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor.

Gareth Fisher has been awarded a short-term research grant

January 3, 2017

Gareth Fisher (Associate Professor) has been awarded a Short-Term research grant from the Association for Asian Studies to conduct research on new Buddhist temple construction in China during the spring semester of 2017.

Rob Ruehl has a VAP at St. John Fisher College

January 3, 2017

Robert Ruehl (Ph.D. 2014) has been appointed Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, NY.

Donovan Schaefer will be an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania

Donovan O. Schaefer (Ph.D. 2012)

Donovan O. Schaefer (Ph.D. 2012)

Donovan O. Schaefer (Ph.D. 2012) will be taking up a new position as an assistant professor in the department of religious studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently a departmental lecturer in science and religion at the University of Oxford. He earned his B.A. in the interdisciplinary Religion, Literature, and the Arts program at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. His master’s and doctoral degrees are from Syracuse University. After completing his doctorate, he held a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Haverford College. His first book, Religious Affects: Animality, Evolution, and Power  (Duke 2015) challenges the notion that religion is inextricably linked to language and belief, proposing instead that it is primarily driven by affects.

Yohan Yoo promoted to full professor at Seoul National University

Yohan Yoo (PhD 2005) has been tenured and promoted to full professor at Seoul National University in Seoul, Korea.